Helping Babies & Mothers Survive

Helping Babies Survive (HBS) and Helping Mothers Survive (HMS) are evidence-based educational programs designed to teach birth attendants around the world how to respond to some of the early dangers faced by babies and their mothers in areas with limited access to health care.

HBS was developed by the World Health Organization, American Academy of Pediatrics, and other global health leaders with the goal of reducing deaths among babies during their first “golden minute” after birth, as well as in the first 28 days of life. HMS also focuses on emergent practices that can help save mothers who may be facing critical, life threatening conditions during the immediate time surrounding birth. HMS, which was developed through jhpiego and Johns Hopkins University, shares basic techniques to reduce maternal death from common issues such as postpartum hemorrhage.

Together with partners in Peru, Nepal, and Tanzania, GHI has brought these training programs to regions that struggle with high newborn and maternal death rates.

HBB in Peru

Partnering Together

HBS was developed by the World Health Organization, American Academy of Pediatrics, and other global health leaders with the goal of reducing deaths among babies during their first “golden minute” after birth, as well as in the first 28 days of life. HMS also focuses on emergent practices that can help save mothers who may be facing critical, life threatening conditions during the immediate time surrounding birth. HMS, which was developed through jhpiego and Johns Hopkins University, shares basic techniques to reduce maternal death from common issues such as postpartum hemorrhage.

Together with partners in Peru, Nepal, and Tanzania, GHI has brought these training programs to regions that struggle with high newborn and maternal death rates.

Educating Local Providers on Neonatal & Maternal Care

Many regions within Peru, Nepal, and Tanzania face challenges of poverty and lack of access to high quality medical care. Often, babies are delivered at home or in small clinics where there are no skilled birth attendants. Our train-the-trainer model prepares community health workers to intervene when a baby is born not breathing or a mother has severe bleeding and enables local providers to teach their peers and create a network of trained attendants.