Centura Transplant

Specialty: Organ Transplant

Location Address

2535 S Downing St
Denver, CO, 80210-5850
Fax: 303-778-5205
Distance:
Phone

About

Experienced, compassionate and focused on you.

Located in Denver, Colorado, Centura Transplant has top surgeons, nephrologists and hepatologists with decades of experience and a focus on giving you compassionate, whole person care. Our surgeons have a combined 46 years of transplant experience at three major U.S. transplant centers, performing more than 500 liver transplants, over 1,000 kidney transplants, more than 300 living donor nephrectomies and over 1,000 dialysis access procedures.

In addition to the outstanding quality of medical care provided, our commitment to team sets us apart. We believe that a strong, high functioning team provides better outcomes and a superior patient experience.

Our Services

As your partner in care, we listen closely to your concerns and meet your specific needs by creating a unique environment where our integrated team takes the time to get to know you. They work with you and your family to provide financial, nutritional and emotional guidance and support, as well as any counseling and ongoing post-transplant care needed

Kidney Transplant

Centura Transplant

Kidney Transplant

With our dedicated, experienced team, we focus more on you.

For those with severe chronic and end-stage kidney disease, kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment of choice. At Centura Transplant, in Denver, Colorado, we have the experienced surgeons and staff to guide you back to a better and healthier life, free of dialysis with its potential complications and hardships. We take pride in giving you the one-on-one care that encompasses your specific needs: medical, surgical, financial, nutritional, emotional and spiritual support and counseling.

We give you this exceptional personal care through our dedicated, high-performing treatment team. This diverse group of experienced physicians and team members take sophisticated, multidisciplinary approaches to complex medical problems affecting the kidney. Our team of highly trained specialists offers both living donor and deceased donor transplantation. Their experience is the culmination of performing more than 1,000 donor transplants over the past four decades. Our nephrologists have managed more than 3,000 patients following kidney transplant, some for more than twenty years, and take pride in developing long-term relationships with their patients.

Patients may qualify for transplants when their kidney function is less than 20% of normal. It’s best to be seen as soon as you are diagnosed with stage 4 (severe) chronic kidney disease. Some of the reasons for chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal failure include:

  • Diabetes
  • High blood pressure (hypertension)
  • Polycystic kidney disease
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus
  • Infections
  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Drug toxicities
  • Autoimmune disorders
  • Urologic problems
  • Previous failed kidney transplant

What procedures do you have in place to ensure the safety of patients during the COVID-19 pandemic?
All patients, visitors and hospital staff are required to check in at the hospital entrance each day where they have their temperature taken and are screened for any symptoms connected to COVID-19. Patients or staff members who have symptoms are routed to appropriate care to prevent exposure in the clinic. In our clinic rooms, providers and patients are both required to wear masks and are distanced at least six feet apart during counseling. When a closer exam is required, members of our team are required to wear both masks and eye shields.

What other procedures do you have in place to protect liver transplant patients, in particular?
We offer telemedicine appointments to patients who are not comfortable coming into your clinic. Special precautions are taken for patients on immunosuppression while admitted to the hospital to minimize risk of exposure to COVID-19.

How long is the typical recovery time following kidney transplants?
Kidney transplant patients generally spend four to five days in the hospital. Patients are discharged from the hospital when they can walk, eat meals and perform all the basic functions of daily living. For the next one to two weeks, patients increase activity at home to regain strength. By the third week after surgery, most patients should be able to return to normal activities. All patients should still avoid lifting any objects for up to six weeks after surgery.

What are my limitations?
Transplant patients may have some dietary limitations after surgery depending on medications and other medical conditions. In addition, for six weeks after transplant surgery, all patients are asked not to lift any extra weight. This reduces the risk of wound complications like hernia and the potential need for further surgery to repair a hernia. A hernia is weakness in the abdominal wall due to the surgery.

May I return to work or engage in physical activity?
Most transplant patients resume lighter forms of physical activity within six to eight weeks after surgery. Returning to work generally occurs after pain medications are no longer needed and physical restrictions are lifted.

What are other important factors transplant donors and recipients need to know about procedures and treatments?
While all surgery comes with inherent risks, most patients do very well after transplant surgery. The biggest change in lifestyle after a kidney or liver transplant is ensuring you are following the prescribed medication schedule and having labs drawn on a regular basis. The adjustment to immunosuppression also involves being more aware of the risk of infection and taking steps to avoid infection, reporting any symptoms on a consistent basis and communicating with your transplant providers regarding all medical issues.

Can you get a kidney transplant if you have diabetes?
Yes. In fact, the majority of our kidney transplant patients do have diabetes, as it is the leading cause of kidney failure.

Will a kidney transplant help cure diabetes?
No. Unfortunately, there is no cure for diabetes. A pancreas transplant can reduce the need for insulin injections in some diabetics. A kidney transplant will correct the kidney failure caused by diabetes.

Am I at risk for diabetes after a transplant?
Yes. Some patients who have never had diabetes may be more likely to develop it after a transplant due to some of the medications they must take to prevent rejection of the transplants. Also, diabetes can worsen after transplant in those patients who had diabetes before transplantation.

What is the standard outcome for someone who receives a kidney transplant?
In general, the success of the kidney transplant is very good. One-year survival is greater than 95% and three-year survival is greater than 89% nationally. Individual success after kidney transplant is dependent on the recipient’s health, the donor organ and the care that is provided to the organ after transplant.

What is the standard life expectancy for someone receiving a kidney transplant?
Patients have a much higher life expectancy after transplant than on dialysis. On average, the actual kidney graft itself lasts anywhere from ten to twelve years for a deceased kidney and fifteen to twenty years for a living donor kidney.

Liver Transplant

Centura Transplant

Liver Transplant

Experience and expertise with comfort and compassion.

At Centura Transplant in Denver, Colorado, we want every patient with chronic liver disease or liver cancer to return to a happier and healthier life as quickly as possible. It starts with our high-performing team working together at Centura Transplant working together to understand your specific medical condition and life situation. The team works with you to create a custom treatment plan that aligns with your goals. Our diverse group of experienced providers and staff specializing in transplant care are here to guide you and your family throughout every stage of your care.

These experienced surgeons and team members embrace a sophisticated, multidisciplinary approach to complex liver problems. They provide you with the knowledge, support and compassion you need. It’s exceptional care coming from more than four decades of experience and over 500 successful liver transplants.

Our Centura Transplant team has decades of experience to treat the following:

  • Acute liver failure: Acetaminophen (Tylenol) overdose, Acute viral liver failure
  • Alcoholic liver disease
  • Viral liver disease: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B (HBV), Hepatitis C (HCV)
  • Fatty liver disease: Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)
  • Autoimmune hepatitis
  • Biliary liver disease: Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), Secondary biliary cirrhosis, Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC)
  • Polycystic liver disease
  • Metabolic liver disease
  • Cancer: Hepatocellular cancer (HCC), Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), Neuroendocrine tumors

What procedures do you have in place to ensure the safety of patients during the COVID-19 pandemic?
All patients, visitors and hospital staff are required to check in at the hospital entrance each day where they have their temperature taken and are screened for any symptoms connected to COVID-19. Patients or staff members who have symptoms are routed to appropriate care to prevent exposure in the clinic. In our clinic rooms, providers and patients are both required to wear masks and are distanced at least six feet apart during counseling. When a closer exam is required, members of our team are required to wear both masks and eye shields.

What other procedures do you have in place to protect liver transplant patients, in particular?
We offer telemedicine appointments to patients who are not comfortable coming into your clinic. Special precautions are taken for patients on immunosuppression while admitted to the hospital to minimize risk of exposure to COVID-19.

Who would be considered a candidate for a liver transplant?
Candidates for liver transplant have a medical condition that liver transplant will directly treat. Patients are evaluated to ensure that no conditions exist that will make the liver transplant surgery too dangerous, such as severe heart disease. Candidates for liver transplant are also evaluated to make sure there are no conditions that would significantly shorten life expectancy after transplant. The final part of the evaluation ensures that people have the ability and resources to care for the organ for life.

How do you determine if someone is a proper candidate?
Evaluation for a liver transplant is a process. It often starts with multiple provider visits and a detailed history and physical as it relates to your liver disease. This initial appointment will determine what testing and labs are appropriate and the need for additional visits with other healthcare providers, such as psychology/psychiatry, substance use counseling, cardiology, gastroenterology, pulmonology and infectious disease. Once your testing and provider visits are complete, the case is presented to the multidisciplinary transplant committee and a decision regarding candidacy is made.

What are some of the criteria you consider when determining a match?
Allocation of livers is done by blood type and severity of disease measured by the MELD score. MELD score is determined by lab tests. When a donor organ is matched with one of our recipients both donor and recipient characteristics are taken into consideration by the transplant provider. Examples of criteria include donor/recipient age, function of the donor organ, size of the organ and severity of the recipient’s illness.

What is the standard waiting time needed to determine a proper match?
The waiting time for liver transplant is highly variable. It can range from weeks to years, depending on your blood type and severity of illness. In general, the higher the MELD score, the more likely you are to be transplanted. Waiting time is a discussion that incorporates individual factors. This discussion happens with you at the time of evaluation.

What risks are there to liver transplantation?
In general, people do well with liver transplant. However, there are risks that include:

  • technical complications that may occur during the surgery
  • the new liver may not work, this is rare
  • infection due to the severity of liver disease and immunosuppression
  • a chance of recurrence of the primary disease
  • bleeding during and immediately after surgery
  • your body may reject the liver

How successful is liver transplantation?
In general, the success of the liver transplant is very good. One-year survival is greater than 90% and three-year survival is greater than 80% nationally. Individual success after liver transplant is dependent on the recipient’s health, the donor organ and the care that is provided to the organ after transplant.

How long is the typical recovery time following liver transplants?
Liver transplant recovery generally involves one week in the hospital and two weeks of getting stronger at home. Lifting is restricted for a total of six weeks following surgery, then three more weeks avoiding lifting objects at home. Most patients no longer need pain medicine within two or three weeks after surgery. Patients are discharged from the hospital when thy can walk, eat meals and perform all the basic functions of daily living.

What are my limitations? May I return to work or engage in physical activity?
Most transplant patients return to the same or better levels of physical activity within months after surgery. Walking is encouraged the day after surgery. Physical activity is slowly increased beginning six weeks after surgery. Returning to work generally occurs after pain medications are no longer needed and physical restrictions are lifted. Typically, people are able to return to work within four to six weeks after transplant surgery.

Living Donor Kidney Transplant

Centura Transplant

Living Donor Kidney Transplant

Ensuring your generous gift of life is in experienced, caring hands.

Donating one of your kidneys to a friend, family member or anonymously to someone in need is one of the greatest gifts you could give to another person. That’s why ensuring you receive safe and exceptional individualized care with our experienced team is of the utmost importance. Here at Centura Transplant in Denver, Colorado, our diverse team of physicians and staff members take a more multidisciplinary approach to kidney transplantation and other complex medical procedures. Our surgeons have performed more than 1,000 kidney transplants.

Living donor kidney transplantation is the best option for any person experiencing severe chronic kidney disease. Donors and recipients both gain comfort knowing they can anticipate shorter waiting times for transplant along with better outcomes as compared to deceased donor transplantations.

If you are interested in donating, our team will offer their expert advice to guide you through the confidential evaluation process. If you discover you and your intended recipient are not compatible, there’s an opportunity to still donate on behalf of your loved one through our paired exchange program. Our Transplant program participates in both the National Kidney Registry and the Alliance for Paired Kidney Donation along with some of the largest and most respected kidney transplant programs in the nation.

Who would qualify in becoming a living kidney donor?
People in good general health can be donors. This usually means having no history of diabetes, no cancer within the last five years, no heart or vascular disease, and no recent or recurrent kidney stones.

What are the standard procedures needed to donate?
Those interested in donation go through four general phases of evaluation.

  • First, potential kidney donors complete an online health screening form to the transplant center to determine if they are possible candidates for donation.
  • Second, the transplant center arranges preliminary tests that include blood and urine samples. These tests make sure that the potential donor has excellent kidney function and no other abnormal laboratory findings related to donation safety.
  • Third, potential kidney donors visit the transplant center for evaluation and discussion with nephrologists, surgeons, nurse coordinators, financial coordinators and social workers. This also includes meeting with an Independent Living Donor Advocate who reviews the potential donor’s goals and motivations for donation. Additional tests may be ordered at this time, including radiology studies of the kidneys and blood vessels.
  • Finally, the donor’s full evaluation is reviewed with the multi-disciplinary team and a decision regarding approval to donate is made.

What are the risks of being a living kidney donor?
In the short term, surgery-related risks may include infection, blood loss, and surgical site healing issues such as hernia formation. All together, complications such as these occur in less than 5 to 10% of donors and generally are easily managed. In the long term, donating a kidney leaves an individual with a reserve of 70% of their original kidney function. This is more than adequate to lead a normal life, since people who need dialysis or kidney transplant typically have approximately 10% of normal kidney function. People who have donated a kidney should continue to follow up with their primary healthcare providers for annual check-ups to monitor for any changes in their health that could affect their kidney function. This includes monitoring for diabetes, high blood pressure and screening for blood and/or protein in the urine that can be detected early and managed.

Do I need to be related to the person to whom I wish to donate?
No. You do not need to be related to the person to whom you wish to donate. Blood types do not need to be identical and tissue matching is helpful, but not mandatory.

Is kidney donation transplantation considered dangerous?
No. Kidney donation transplantation is not a dangerous procedure. It is performed laparoscopically and the typical hospital stay is one to two days.

Will my life expectancy be cut short by having kidney donation transplantation?
No. Transplantation does not affect a donor’s life expectancy.

Can I still have children after having kidney donation transplantation?
Yes. You will still have the ability to have children.

Hepatobiliary Surgery

Centura Transplant

Hepatobiliary Surgery

Hepatobiliary surgery at Centura Transplant includes treatments for cancer or anatomical abnormalities of the liver, bile ducts, gallbladder and pancreas. Given the specialized nature of liver and pancreas transplantation, our team has unique capabilities to solve the most complex hepatobiliary problems.

Our specialists treat and assess the following conditions:

  • Bile duct injuries
  • Benign biliary conditions (e.g. structure, choledochal cyst)
  • Malignant and benign neoplasms of the liver, pancreas, and bile ducts
  • Benign biliary tract disease in cirrhotic patients
  • Symptomatic liver cysts

Our specialists perform the following procedures:

  • Liver resections
  • Bile duct reconstruction/repair
  • Whipple procedure (pancreatoduodenectomy)
  • Distal pancreatectomy
  • Surgery on cirrhotics
  • Laparoscopic/minimally invasive procedures

Gastroenterologists/Hepatologists
Physicians with training in digestive diseases and advanced training in the management of liver disease.

Advanced Endoscopists
Physicians with advanced training in in endoscopic techniques including endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and endoscopic ultrasound (EUS).

Surgeons
All of our surgeons have completed training in general, hepatobiliary and abdominal transplant surgery making them uniquely qualified to tackle even the most complex operations, including minimally invasive techniques.

Interventional radiologists
Physicians trained in radiology with advanced training in minimally invasive techniques, which are often an adjunct to hepatobiliary treatment either before or after surgery.

Radiation oncologists
Physicians who use radiation therapy as an adjunct to hepatobiliary treatment.

Medical oncologists
Physicians who specialize in the treatment of cancer and guide adjuvant therapy with chemotherapy. In many instances, these physicians may be able to enroll you in clinical trials for treatment of advanced cancers.

Pathologists
Physicians who look at samples of tissue and help with the diagnosis and staging of hepatobiliary disease.

How do I get seen by the Hepatobiliary Team at Porter Adventist Hospital?
Most patients are referred by their primary care provider or gastroenterology specialist. 

How do I know that I am eligible for surgery?
All of our referred patients are presented in our weekly, multidisciplinary hepatobiliary conference where experts from different specialties discuss all options for treatment and design a plan that best fits your needs.

How long will I wait to get surgery?
Our goal is to facilitate your referral and evaluation and make sure that you understand your options. With priority given to patients with cancer, most operations and treatments can be arranged in less than two weeks from the date of your initial encounter.

Hepatology Program

Centura Transplant

Hepatology Program

A personalized patient experience to guide and support you through your treatment journey.

The hepatology program at Centura Transplant is an essential component of Centura Health’s medical and surgical strategy to manage all patients with liver disease. Our program focuses on providing exceptional care and a personalized patient experience. The hepatology team consists of experienced physicians and physician assistants who trained at some of the most outstanding programs in the country, and hold a wealth of experience.

Conditions We Treat

  • Abnormal liver enzymes
  • Alcoholic liver disease
  • Viral liver disease
    • Hepatitis A
    • Hepatitis B (HBV)
    • Hepatitis C (HCV)
    • Other viruses such as EBV and CMV
    Autoimmune liver disease
    • Autoimmune hepatitis
    • Primary biliary cholangitis (PBC)
    • Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC)
  • Metabolic liver disease
    • Hemochromatosis
    • Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency
    • Wilson’s disease
    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
    • Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)
  • Cirrhosis in patients who are currently too early for liver transplant
    • Alcoholic liver disease
    • Cryptogenic cirrhosis
    • Genetic liver disease
    • Metabolic liver diseases
    Polycystic liver disease
  • Liver masses
    • Benign tumors
    • Malignant tumors
      • Primary liver cancer
      • Metastatic cancer

Hepatologists
Physicians with training in digestive diseases and advanced training in the management of liver disease. Our hepatologists diagnose and manage many issues related to acute (sudden) and chronic (long-standing) liver disease.

Physician assistants
Physician assistants, or PAs, are healthcare professionals who practice medicine as a part of a healthcare team and collaborate with physicians. For the Porter hepatology team, the PAs work closely with the hepatologists and diagnose and manage patients with chronic liver disease.

Pharmacist
Sometimes the treatment of liver diseases will require complex medication regimens. The pharmacist will guide you through the process and make sure you will be able to obtain and take your medication appropriately.

How do I get seen by the Hepatology Team at Porter Adventist Hospital?
Most patients are referred by their primary care provider or gastroenterology specialist. Please click this *link* if you would like more information about being referred or would like to make a self-referral.

How do I know that I need to be seen by a hepatologist?
If you have been diagnosed with liver disease or were told that you have abnormal liver testing, you should be evaluated by a hepatologist.

How long will I wait to get seen?
Our goal is to facilitate your referral and evaluation and make sure that you understand your options. Every effort will be made to make sure you are seen as soon as possible.

Dialysis Access

Centura Transplant

Dialysis Access

Our surgeons will work with you and your nephrologist to select the best dialysis method for you.

Dialysis access services at Centura Transplant is an essential component of Centura Health’s medical and surgical strategy to manage all patients with chronic kidney disease. Dialysis is a treatment that provides some of the functions of the kidney that are no longer possible when the kidneys begin to fail.

There are two main forms of dialysis, hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis: 

  • Hemodialysis is the treatment that removes blood from the body so it can be filtered through a machine (dialyzer) and then returned to the body. The blood is removed from and returned to the body through a vascular access. Vascular access can be a catheter, an arteriovenous fistula or arteriovenous graft.
  • Peritoneal dialysis removes wastes and extra fluids by using your own body as the filter (the peritoneum). Access for this type of dialysis is with a special catheter, placed in the abdomen. Waste passes through the peritoneum, into the dialysis solution, which is then drained out of the abdomen.

How do I get seen at Centura Transplant Center for dialysis access?
Most patients are referred by either their primary care provider or kidney specialist (nephrologist). 

What type of dialysis access is the best option for me?
We will work with your referring provider in order to determine the best choice for dialysis access for you. In general, our goal is to minimize the use of catheters and artificial grafts in hemodialysis. The best choices for most patients is either an arteriovenous fistula or peritoneal dialysis catheters.

What are the outcomes with dialysis access procedures?
The risk and benefits of each type of dialysis access procedure will be described in detail during your visit with us.

Conditions We Treat

  • Chronic Kidney Disease
  • Chronic Liver Disease
  • Gall Bladder Cancer
  • Liver Cancer
  • Pancreatic Cancer
  • Renal Failure
Vedula Giridhari, MD

Centura Transplant offers each patient and family:

  • Personalized, whole person care that focuses on you
  • State-of-the-art medical and surgical treatment options
  • Patient and caregiver support and resources
  • Ease of access
  • Experienced, compassionate multidisciplinary team
  • Ongoing communication with your referring provider
  • A connected network of care

Providers

Thomas Collins, MD
Organ Transplant, General Surgery
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Mary Ann Huang, MD
Transplant Hepatology, Gastroenterology
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James Lim, MD
Organ Transplant, General Surgery
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Richard Lovato, MD
General Surgery
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M T
Monica Tincopa, MD
Transplant Hepatology, Internal Medicine, Gastroenterology
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Giridhar Vedula, MD
Organ Transplant, General Surgery
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Alexander Wiseman, MD
Nephrology, Internal Medicine
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Karl Womer, MD
Nephrology, Internal Medicine
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Lizbeth Gibson, NP
Nurse Practitioner, General Surgery
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H H
Heidi Harrold, PA-C
Physician Assistant, Organ Transplant
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Chandra Hodgman, PA-C
Physician Assistant, General Surgery
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R S
Rachel Sabolish, NP
Palliative Medicine, Nurse Practitioner
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J W
Jennifer Wilson, CNS
Registered Nurse, Palliative Medicine, Clinical Nurse Specialist
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Locations

Centura Transplant
2535 S Downing St
Denver, CO, 80210-5850
Phone: 303-778-5797
Fax: 303-778-5205
Centura Transplant - Rocky Mountain Center
315 North 25th St
BILLINGS, MT, 591022491
Phone: 303-778-5797
Fax: 303-778-5205
Centura Transplant - Yellowstone Center
2900 12th Ave North
BILLINGS, MT, 591010905
Phone: 303-778-5797
Fax: 303-778-5205
Centura Transplant Penrose
2222 N Nevada Ave
COLORADO SPRINGS, CO, 80907-6819
Phone: 303-778-5797
Fax: 303-778-5205
Centura Transplant St. Anthony North
14300 Orchard Pkwy
WESTMINSTER, CO, 80023-9206
Phone: 303-778-5797
Fax: 303-778-5205

Patient Resources

Transplant FAQs. The answers to questions important to you and yours.

Centura Transplant

Transplant FAQs. The answers to questions important to you and yours.

What procedures do you have in place to ensure the safety of patients during the COVID-19 pandemic?
All patients, visitors and hospital staff are required to check in at the hospital entrance each day where they have their temperature taken and are screened for any symptoms connected to COVID-19. Patients or staff members who have symptoms are routed to appropriate care to prevent exposure in the clinic. In our clinic rooms, providers and patients are both required to wear masks and are distanced at least six feet apart during counseling. When a closer exam is required, members of our team are required to wear both masks and eye shields.

What other procedures do you have in place to protect liver and kidney transplant patients?
We offer telemedicine appointments to patients who are not comfortable coming into our clinic. In addition, special precautions are taken for patients on immunosuppression while admitted to the hospital to minimize risk of exposure to COVID-19.

How long is the typical recovery time following liver transplants?
Liver transplant recovery generally involves one week in the hospital and two weeks of getting stronger at home. Lifting is restricted for a total of six weeks following surgery. Most patients no longer need pain medicine within two or three weeks after surgery. Patients are discharged from the hospital when they can walk, eat meals and perform all the basic functions of daily living.

How long is the typical recovery time following kidney transplants?
Kidney transplant patients generally spend four to five days in the hospital. Patients are discharged from the hospital when they can walk, eat meals and perform all the basic functions of daily living. The following one to two weeks, patients strengthen while at home and gradually increase activity. By three weeks after surgery, most patients feel fairly back to normal from an activity standpoint. All patients are asked to avoid lifting objects for six weeks after surgery.

What are my limitations?
Transplant patients may have some dietary limitations after surgery depending on medications and other medical conditions. In addition, lifting is restricted for a total of six weeks following surgery. This reduces the risk of wound complications like hernia and the potential need for further surgery to repair a hernia.

May I return to work or engage in physical activity?
Most transplant patients return to the same or better levels of physical activity within months after surgery. Walking is encouraged the day after surgery. Physical activity is slowly increased beginning six weeks after surgery. Returning to work generally occurs after pain medications are no longer needed and physical restrictions are lifted. Typically, people are able to return to work within four to six weeks after transplant surgery.

What are other important factors transplant recipients need to know about procedures and treatments?
While all surgery comes with inherent risks, most patients do very well after transplant surgery. The biggest change in lifestyle after a kidney or liver transplant is ensuring you are following the prescribed medication schedule and having labs drawn on a regular basis. The adjustment to immunosuppression also involves being more aware of the risk of infection and taking steps to avoid infection, reporting any symptoms on a consistent basis and communicating with transplant providers regarding all medical issues.

Transplant Connect

Centura Transplant

Transplant Connect

Transplant Connect is an online referral and communications portal for providers only, currently available to Dialysis Centers and Nephrology practices.

If you are not currently provisioned as a user and would like more information, please reach out to our Provider Relations contact, Laura McCommons at LauraMcCommons@centura.org.