Vaccine Myth Busting

Dr. Chris Hudson, CMO, and Stephanie Clements, CNO
Debra Connelly, caregiver

Myth Busters – Do you have the have facts on the COVID-19 Vaccine?

One of our greatest joys is watching people receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Mercy Regional Medical Center has vaccinated more than 2,000 people to date and we are now giving some health care workers their second dose. For each associate, affiliated provider and community partner, this is a giant step toward normalcy.

We recognize some people are still fearful of the vaccine. Unfortunately, it is all too easy to find misinformation so, in order to protect our friends, family and community, we are busting the myths that may be holding people back.

Myth: I had COVID-19 so I don’t need the vaccine.
There are severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and re-infection is possible. The vaccine offers additional benefit and the CDC recommends that you get the vaccine even if you have had a COVID-19 infection.

Myth: I have a high COVID-19 antibody count. I don’t need the vaccine.
At this time, experts do not know how long natural immunity lasts after recovering from COVID-19. The vaccine offers additional benefit and the CDC recommends that you get the vaccine even if you have had a COVID-19 infection.

Myth: I can get COVID-19 from the vaccine.
COVID-19 vaccines do not contain live virus and cannot give you COVID-19.

Myth: I will be protected against COVID-19 after the first dose, and I don’t need a second dose.
It’s important to get the second dose in order to get the most protection the vaccine can offer. You won’t get the full duration of protection from the vaccines until one to two weeks after the second dose.

Myth: The vaccine isn’t safe.
COVID-19 vaccines were tested in large clinical trials with a diverse group of individuals to make sure they meet safety standards. There were no significant safety concerns identified. We will not administer a COVID-19 vaccine unless the FDA has determined it is safe and effective.

Myth: I have allergies, I shouldn’t get the vaccine.
People with severe allergies who have experienced anaphylaxis in the past or allergic reactions to vaccines should talk to their primary care doctor about whether they should get the COVID-19 vaccine. If you had a severe reaction (anaphylaxis) to the first dose, the second dose is not recommended.

Myth: A COVID-19 vaccine will alter my DNA.
No. mRNA vaccines work with the body’s natural defenses to safely develop immunity to disease. mRNA does not enter a cell’s nucleus, where DNA is stored. Once mRNA generates an immune response, it degrades quickly and is gone.

Scientists have been studying mRNA vaccines for years. Learn more about how COVID-19 mRNA vaccines work.

Myth: I’m young and low-risk and I don’t need to get the vaccine.
It is possible to contract and infect others with COVID-19 even if you don’t experience any symptoms of the virus. It’s important to get the vaccine so that you don’t unknowingly infect a vulnerable person around you.

Myth: I’m planning to get pregnant, and pregnant women shouldn’t get the vaccine.
Pregnancy doesn’t necessarily prevent you from getting the vaccine. Talk to your doctor about what’s best for you.

Myth: I can build up my own immunity.
Experts do not know how long immunity lasts after infection. It’s important to get the vaccine so that you don’t get COVID-19 and unknowingly infect a vulnerable person around you.

For more information on the COVID-19 vaccine, please visit our website by clicking here.